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Videos & Stories

Windsor-Essex has a rich history of African Canadians who made their way to our area via the Underground Railroad. Many of them have truly remarkable stories to share and the Amherstburg Freedom Museum has compiled a number of them, as told by their family members.

We also have a number of WECDSB graduates and other local leaders who are making an impact on their community by raising awareness about equity issues.

View some of their stories here:


Arjei Franklin is a former University of Windsor football player who spent seven seasons in the CFL and is now a Constable with the Windsor Police Service. Hear what he has to say about how he can help make his community a more equitable place through his role as a police officer.



Video credit to Amherstburg Freedom Museum Listen to Claudia Rae White talk about the Binga family and their flight from slavery in Kentucky.



Miah-Marie Langlois is a graduate of Catholic Central High School who is now a member of Team Canada's women's basketball team, which will compete in the 2021 Summer Olympics. Hear what she has to say about her experiences as a student athlete and what she can do to help inspire other black students to achieve their goals.



Video credit to Amherstburg Freedom Museum Listen to Kimberly Simmons tell the history of her great great great grandmother, Caroline Quarlls Watkins, the first Underground Railroad "passenger" in Wisconsin who made it to freedom in Canada.



Vicky Adjetey-Nelson is a graduate of St. Joseph's Catholic High School who is now the Director of Business Effectiveness for CIBC. Hear about what she has done to help mentor diverse populations in their careers and act as a role model for young Black students looking to enter the world of business.



Kurt Downes is a teacher at St. James Catholic Elementary School and a well-known local track coach who was recently named Canadian Running Magazine's Community Builder of the Year. Hear what he has to say about the importance of Black History Month.



Jeremiah Bowers is a graduate of Holy Names Catholic High School, a former WECDSB Student Trustee, a graduate of the University of Windsor, and a former President of the University of Windsor Student Alliance who is now a Special Projects Coordinator in the Office of the President at the University of Windsor. Hear what he has to say about how the education system can work together to promote a greater sense of unity and equity.



Video credit to Amherstburg Freedom Museum Listen as Fred Johnson recalls the history of his family, told to him by his father about his grandfather, Gabriel Timberlake, who was enslaved in Kentucky.

An abolitionist working as an overseer suggested Timberlake, then 19 years old, run away with others who were planning an escape. Aided by Quakers and supporters, the young man chose to risk his life like so many others, in a bid for freedom. They followed the north star by wagon, foot and boat, determined to elude bounty hunters and slave catchers until they crossed the Detroit River to Amherstburg.



Jamie Adjetey-Nelson is a graduate of St. Joseph's Catholic High School who is now a member of the Windsor Police Service. Hear what he has to say about the importance of Black History Month, the people who influenced him, and how he is making a difference in our community.



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